6 Comments
Oct 20, 2023Liked by Melissa Bowman

Maybe I'm biased because I spent a year during my early twenties in Japan, where their transit is top notch and also EXTREMELY full of advertising on every square inch...

I think it makes fiscal sense. I often wonder to myself why transit in Canada has so few advertisements inside it (the busses and trains in Japan even had ad space on the top of the plastic handles that standing passengers would use) considering that it would generate a lot of revenue.

Also, perhaps it is because I am not working in this field, but it seems very possible to wrap entire trains / busses without obscuring the windows. Consider the examples of the Pokemon trains and busses in Japan (https://tinyurl.com/mtasdfbs; https://tinyurl.com/4442xtsa; https://tinyurl.com/2xapbszt; https://tinyurl.com/475uzjxf)- the characters and words are on the surfaces that are not windows. I think creativity in advertising is the problem, here.

On the note of using Pokemon as an example - I think that selection criteria absolutely should be in place, and each ad considered carefully. In this example, Pokemon seemed a bizarre choice to me at first, but it was explained to me that it is a brand that brings joy to kids and adults alike, it is friendly and welcoming to all ages/genders/races, and associated with good memories/experiences. Why wouldn't a transit line want to have that sort of advertising? Instead of riding a an abortion bus, or a public transit vehicle promoting ... a car dealership.

In Edmonton, their LRT has an art program, where certain trains are moveable art exhibits for weeks at a time. I think the ION and/or GRT could consider partnering with local cultural institutions every once in a while to promote exhibits, as well!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Melissa Bowman

Yes, I wrote to Councillors Huinink and McCabe about "no more advertising on GRT please" and got a reply "ok! Will advocate for that" from Huinink.

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I wonder whether most advertising on the outside of buses is targeting public transit users or car drivers (who see the ads when they get stuck behind a bus). Similarly I wonder whether the push back on advertising on buses is coming from public transit users or from car drivers. I am in favour of advertising on buses which are standing room only if it's a way of increasing frequency (I am looking at you bus service to Cambridge and bus service to conestoga college) or of purchasing much needed articulated/bendy buses

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I think the idea of advertising on the city/region owned non-public-transit vehicles should be considered if finances are a concern. Advertising on police vehicles, for example with quality counseling/therapy services operated by Black Americans, would simultaneously bring in advertising dollars, which can be used for paying public transit drivers/maintenance staff/cleaners/etc well and keeping public transit affordable, and would inform residents of excellent services through which one may attempt to heal from the trauma caused by the police, including and not limited to the gargantuan expansions of their already bulbous blot of funding.

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